NBER

Dan Black

1155 E. 60th Street
Harris School
University of Chicago
Chicago, IL 606037

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: University of Chicago

NBER Working Papers and Publications

October 2019A Cross-Cohort Analysis of Human Capital Specialization and the College Gender Wage Gap
with Carolyn Sloane, Erik Hurst: w26348
In this paper, we exploit new data to assess gender differences in pre-labor market specialization among the college educated and highlight how those differences have evolved over time. We highlight new results pertaining to gender differences in the mapping between undergraduate major and subsequent occupational sorting. To perform our analysis, we introduce new indices in potential wage space that measure gender differences in major choice and separately the subsequent occupational sorting conditional on major choice. We highlight that women both choose majors with lower potential earnings (based on male wages associated with those majors) and that they then subsequently sort into occupations with lower potential earnings given their major choice. We highlight that these differences have...
July 2017The Methuselah Effect: The Pernicious Impact of Unreported Deaths on Old Age Mortality Estimates
with Yu-Chieh Hsu, Seth G. Sanders, Lynne Steuerle Schofield, Lowell J. Taylor: w23574
We examine inferences about old age mortality that arise when researchers use survey data matched to death records. We show that even small rates of failure to match respondents can lead to substantial bias in the measurement of mortality rates at older ages. This type of measurement error is consequential for three strands in the demographic literature: (1) the deceleration in mortality rates at old ages, (2) the black-white mortality crossover, and (3) the relatively low rate of old age mortality among Hispanics—often called the “Hispanic paradox.” Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men (NLS-OM) matched to death records in both the U.S. Vital Statistics system and the Social Security Death Index, we demonstrate that even small rates of missing mortality matching plausibly l...

Published: Dan A. Black & Yu-Chieh Hsu & Seth G. Sanders & Lynne Steuerle Schofield & Lowell J. Taylor, 2017. "The Methuselah Effect: The Pernicious Impact of Unreported Deaths on Old-Age Mortality Estimates," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(6), pages 2001-2024, December. citation courtesy of

January 2009Comment on "The Role of Fringe Benefits in Employer and Workforce Dynamics"
in Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, Timothy Dunne, J. Bradford Jensen, and Mark J. Roberts, editors

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